KLM’s three-year funding for the development of a 3900 m² self-sufficient garden and food forest at Mother of Peace Home for abandoned and abused children in North Riding has now come to a successful conclusion.

“When KLM approached us to support a food forest in Johannesburg, it was challenging to identify a beneficiary. We looked for a suitable beneficiary with enough water, the necessary commitment and space. We found the perfect site in Mother of Peace,” says Robyn Hills, Food & Trees for Africa Head of Programmes. 

Food forests use natural forest ecology as the basis for a food-production system. There are seven main vegetation layers, ranging from the canopy to soil surface groundcover and rhizosphere (root vegetables). They are designed to fill these layers with productive, food-giving support crops, to create interconnected plant communities to maximise productivity and minimise inputs.

The large-scale design of the food forest at Mother of Peace was implemented systematically in the first three months. “We installed additional shade net structures, created permaculture spirals, enhanced the existing fruit tree orchard, did a mass pruning, and planted close to 125 fruit and indigenous trees, as well as indigenous fruiting trees for birds,” Hills explains.

Over the last two years the project has been given increasing autonomy, with the goal to make it totally self-sufficient. “This involved making sure they had sustainable techniques, their own seedlings, the ability to make compost. We also needed to ensure that the garden would be able to continue without us,” expands Hills. “This primary objective has been achieved! In this time, the garden has seen animals like rabbits and ducks being integrated into the system. The children play under the fruit trees in the orchard. It is a safe, productive, and flourishing garden that we’re extremely proud of… the key characteristics are healthy soil and healthy relationships!”

, , , , ,
Previous Post
Food gardens nourish learners
Next Post
Ancient food forests – the true Gardens of Eden?

Related Posts

FTFA EduPlant programme tiger brands 2022

FTFA EduPlant Programme nourishes the minds of the next generation

23 March 2022 – The EduPlant Programme is South Africa’s longest-running and most impactful school greening and gardening programme. Food & Trees for Africa (FTFA) has run the programme since 1994, bringing food gardens to thousands of South African schools…

KwaNgubeni cultivates success from FTFA’s Permaculture Starter Pack (PSP)

The benefits of skills taught in Food & Trees for Africa’s Permaculture Starter Pack (PSP) shine through in KwaNgubeni Primary School’s approach to sustainability. The school’s commitment and dedication to food security and environmental issues have been developed beyond this…
FTFA_KLM_MotherOfPeace

How to start your food forest and what to plant

Are you struggling to figure out how to start your food forest? It can be hard to know what and where to plant, so taking the first step can be daunting. But if you know how to design your food…
FTFA KLM_MotherOfPeace_FoodForest

What is a food forest, and how do I design one?

What is a food forest? How can you get one started? A food forests is permaculture in action. It is a layered ‘forest garden’ that features large, food-producing fruit and nut trees. These low-maintenance, self-sustaining systems have huge potential to…
FTFA Agroforesty Food Forest

Food forests benefits, water retention and flood management

Water retention and flood management are undervalued benefits provided by food forests. Food forests and other green spaces play a pivotal role in the hydrological cycle by soaking up large volumes of water. For instance, impermeable surfaces like tarmac greatly…